‘Prison Break’ Reboot Cast Explains Why The Reboot Makes Sense

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FOX’s popular drama “Prison Break” ended its run in 2009. But seven years later, given the industry’s fascination with reboots, the series is back with the original cast. Show creator Paul Scheuring returns as well, working with executive producers Vaun Wilmott and Michael Horowitz to craft the nine-hour story. The cast and creatives appeared at a special premiere event at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills on Wednesday. The panel featured cast members Wentworth Miller, Dominic Purcell, Robert Knepper, Rockmond Dunbar, Mark Feuerstein, Inbar Lavi, Augustus Prew and Paul Adelstein, and focused on why the reboot makes sense now.

Purcell recalled how the reboot got off the ground. “Wentworth and I started reminiscing about the good old days on ‘Prison Break,’” he said. “And [we] talked about the Netflix generation discovering shows there.”

Scheuring chimed in, “There’s no version of recreating the show without Dominic and Wentworth. We found tent pole points we could use to make a modern version of the show, then went to FOX.”

Asked how it felt to slip back into T-Bag’s fake hand, Knepper offered, “All of us felt like we wanted to create, not recreate. It felt like it was time to do it. Paul listened to us and gave us something new.”

Lavi is a new cast member who plays Sheba, a woman who helps Lincoln Burrows find his brother in the Middle East prison. Lavi said with a laugh, “I’m just the tour guide. Sheba is a Yemeni activist and freedom fighter.” Feuerstein is another newcomer to the show and he commented on playing Sarah’s (Sarah Wayne Callies) new husband, Jacob. “I may not be the most likable character,” he shared. “I’m going up against Michael for Sarah’s love.”

Prew is a new face in the prison, playing Michael Scofield’s cellmate. He couldn’t hide his delight when he realized his character was a part of the prison escape plan. “Michael and I going to break out of the prison together. What?!” he said.

Miller was tight-lipped when asked about how exactly Michael Scofield is alive. He hinted cryptically, “The Michael we knew died. The man we meet now is someone different. Michael’s always existed in the gray scale. There are lines he inches up to and crosses.”

Scheuring added, “I want Michael Scofield to feel like a mystery again, like he did in Season 1.” One holdover from the original series, Michael has new tattoos in the new episodes.

Finally, will this revival be the final chapter in the “Prison Break” story? Miller said, “These episodes feel like a satisfying way to fade to black. If they came up with something that stood up to what came before, I’d consider doing more.” His partner in crime, Purcell, said he’d do more: “If it paid homage to the ‘Prison Break’ legend.”

“Prison Break” returns April 4 to Fox.

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Written by variety.com

LeBron James Believes ‘Kardashian Curse’

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LeBron James was never a superstitious man, until Khloe Kardashian came along. Following the Cavaliers losing streak, the NBA player is starting to believe that the ‘Kardashian Curse’ is affecting Tristan Thompson and the team. We’ve got the EXCLUSIVE!

What’s going on with the Cleveland Cavaliers this season? They’re not winning as many games as expected, and LeBron James, 32, thinks he knows the reason why. Unfortunately, he’s shifting the blame onto teammate Tristan Thompson‘s, 26, romance with Khloe Kardashian, 32. “The Cavs haven’t been playing up to their potential lately, and they’re coming up with every reason possible for their bad play,” a source tells HollywoodLife.com EXCLUSIVELY. “LeBron actually joked and talked about the Kardashian curse being real.”

This wouldn’t be the first time an athlete blamed a relationship for their losses. The Green Bay Packers once trolled Olivia Munn for Aaron Rodgers‘ rocky season. And, poor Khloe has been in this position before with Lamar Odom. LA Lakers fans blamed the reality star for Lamar’s on-and-off the basketball court behavior that eventually had him traded to a different team. Making matters worse, Tristan’s team are avoiding him because of Khloe’s alleged bad luck. “The Cavs are dodging Tristan now,” the source continues. “Everyone is superstitious that Khloe and the curse have something to do with their poor play.”

Unfortunately, the Good American jeans designer isn’t the only one in her family who carries the supposed curse. Kim and Kourtney Kardashian have also been blamed for throwing their men into a downward spiral. Kanye West was hospitalized at UCLA Medical Center for having a mental breakdown not too long ago, and Scott Disick has been in and out of rehab for years. Oh, and then there’s Kris Jenner, whose ex-husband transitioned into a woman after their divorce. That’s not exactly an ideal track record.

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Written by hollywoodlife.com

Sherry Lansing On Post-Studio Life

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The former Paramount chief, whose biography ‘Leading Lady’ hits shelves April 25, opens up about the pain of reliving her mother’s death, what TV she’s bingeing (‘The Young Pope’), friends Tom Cruise and Mel Gibson and the mantra of her movies: “If someone screws you over, you have the right to get even.”

For Leading Lady, the new biography of Sherry Lansing, the legendary film executive had to do something she never did during her 12 years running Paramount Pictures: relinquish control. Lansing, 72, participated in the biography but she and her husband, filmmaker William Friedkin, granted author Stephen Galloway full autonomy to research her life, talk to dozens of her closest friends (and not-so-close collaborators) and write the book as he saw fit. Having read the final product after four years of interviews, Lansing invited THR to her Century City office (overlooking the Fox lot, which she famously ran as the first female studio boss in 1980) to talk about being the subject of a biography, reliving her mother’s death from cancer, her hopes for Paramount today and her new life as a philanthropist (Stand Up to Cancer, which she co-founded, has raised about $500 million to fight the disease). Is Lansing scared what people will think of the book? “Terrified,” she says.

Which parts of Leading Lady were the most difficult to read?

Reliving my father’s death. Reliving my mother’s death was extraordinarily painful for me to talk about. To go back into when you were a child and to remember all the insecurities. Reliving my time as an actress and remembering what it was like to face those rejections and all the feelings of the lack of self-worth. To relive the making of a lot of the movies, because I was kind of surprised at how difficult everyone was and how many fights there were.

What is something in the book that will surprise your friends?

That I was so painfully insecure for so long and that I went into therapy. I never kept it a secret, but I think that will probably surprise people. It doesn’t go away. Suddenly you just have a loss of confidence (snaps fingers), and you don’t know where it came from. And then the tools that you learn through therapy get you through it. I’m 72 years old, and every once in a while that 12-year-old little girl who lost her father just (snaps) comes right back up.

Lansing’s mother, Margot. “Everything I do is in honor of her,” she says.What will women in Hollywood take away from your story?

Certainly, times are better. There are women running companies, studios. We almost had a woman president. I remember when none of that was there. You can either say the glass is half full or the glass is half empty. It’s not a perfect world; I know what the numbers are for women directors, and I know how far we still have to go, but we have made progress.

Is there one movie that got away?

I remember pictures, like Searching for Bobby Fischer, that I loved more than life itself and they never could find an audience. People outside of the business don’t know that you don’t want to get out of bed when you fail with a movie. It hurts you.

How often do you and Billy go to the movies?

I see almost everything that comes out — two or three movies a week. I love binge-watching TV, too. I watched Homeland and binged on The Young Pope. I’m curious because I haven’t seen This Is Us.

What film has impressed you recently?

La La Land blew me away. Damien Chazelle is one of the most gifted young filmmakers I’ve ever seen.

Do you think you gave up a lot for your career?

I don’t regret any of my choices, so the answer is no, because I didn’t give up a great love for my career. I got lucky: I met my husband when I was 47, and I was able at that point to not make sacrifices, just to adjust our life schedule to work with one another.

What do you miss most about Paramount?

I don’t miss anything about the movie business. Life is all about chapters, and when I left, I was done. I’d been involved in close to 200 films and the passion I had for making movies was gone. The dream was for creating a foundation dedicated to cancer research, education and now putting retired people back to work. I didn’t lose my old friends. I still see everybody, I keep up with what’s going on in the business. My world just got so much bigger. We can have a group of friends over, and there can be some scientist who is trying to find a cure for cancer and somebody who just directed a movie. There’s a fallacy that if you leave the business nobody talks to you.

Is cancer the aspect of your charity work you’d like to be remembered for?

Yes, in honor of my mother. She died when she was 64. And it was so painful to watch her suffer. Everything I do is in honor of my mother. My dream is that in my lifetime there will be a cure for cancer or that it’ll be a chronic disease.

Paramount is in a period of transition. Do you hope the Redstones keep it?

Oh, yes. I still see Sumner and Shari, and I’m crazy about both of them. He is like an older brother — one of the most supportive bosses anyone could ask for.

What did you learn from the book? My favorite anecdote was Bob Zemeckis sneaking away on weekends to shoot the running scenes for Forrest Gump.

I didn’t know that [happened].

Do you consider that movie your biggest success?

It’s too glib to say, “Oh, my favorite movies are Forrest Gump, Titanic and Braveheart” because they won the Academy Award.

They also made a zillion dollars.

Yes, but so did Mission: Impossible. You work just as hard and love the ones that aren’t successful.

There’s a lot in the book about your relationship with Tom Cruise.

I’ve known Tom since Taps. I knew his family. He was at that time one of the most gifted actors — you could see right away. He’s one of the kindest, most decent people I’ve ever worked with.

What about Scientology?

I know he’s a Scientologist, but I never saw him do anything that made anybody uncomfortable. I think everyone is entitled to their belief system.

You’ve been a big Mel Gibson supporter as well.

Very much. I loved Hacksaw Ridge. Mel is very hardworking, very much understands the problems of the studio system. I have only had positive experiences with him. In my experience, he has never been homophobic or anti-Semitic.

Kiss the Girls, Double Jeopardy — there’s a genre of movies people call the Sherry Lansing thriller. Are you proud of that?

Yes. Those movies were from my heart, from my desire not to be a victim, from my sense of justice. It was something in the way that I was raised: I watched my mother not be a victim after my father died. And revenge was good — I mean, that’s a terrible thing to say, but if someone screws you over, you have the right to get even.

Are you nervous about the book?

(Laughs.) Yes, very. I’m terrified of it because I don’t know how it will be perceived. How can you judge a book that’s about you?

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Written by hollywoodreporter.com

The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air Cast Reunited

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The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air cast reunited at the beach recently, with big smiles on their faces.

Alfonso Ribeiro, who played Carlton in the TV series, posted a photo to his Instagram account of the group, which included Will Smith, Tatyana Ali, Karyn Parsons, Daphne Maxwell Reid and Joseph Marcell.

“Always amazing to spend an afternoon with my Fresh Prince family,” said Ribeiro. “Wishing that James Avery was still with us to make this complete.” Avery, who played Uncle Phil, passed away in 2013 due to complications from heart surgery.

Fans expressed their love of the ’90s show in Ribeiro’s comments, talking about how much they missed it and sending love to the cast members while also remembering Avery.

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Cheech Marin: ‘Cheech Is Not My Real Name… But Don’t Call Me Chong!’

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The pioneering stoner comedian recalls his long strange trip in a new memoir, ‘Cheech is Not My Real Name… But Don’t Call Me Chong!’ with stories about his split with partner Tommy Chong and getting high with Little Richard and Peter Sellers.

While giving an art lecture in San Diego two years ago, Cheech Marin stirred things up with hilarious anecdotes about the legendary comedic duo, Cheech & Chong. An audience member named Margaret McBride approached afterward and suggested he write some of his stories down. “Turns out she was a literary agent. She got me the book deal and here we are,” he tells The Hollywood Reporter about the origins of his new memoir, Cheech Is Not My Real Name… But Don’t Call Me Chong!

After honing their act in a Vancouver strip club, Cheech & Chong (Marin is a native Angeleno; Chong was born in Edmonton, Alberta) hit it big when producer Lou Adler signed them to a record deal. In 1971, Cheech and Chong captured the zeitgeist of the hippie movement with its unique brand of pot-based humor, making them stars. Several multiple double-platinum albums later, they made their first movie, Up in Smoke, which became the highest-grossing comedy of 1978.

After a falling out in the mid-’80s, they parted ways but Marin, 70, continues to thrive in Hollywood (he reprises his Ramone character in Cars 3, opening June 16) and in the art world, as a renowned collector of Chicano works. Here, Richard Anthony Marin, who’ll speak about his book at The Broad Stage in Santa Monica March 30, recalls smoking pot with Little Richard, smoking hash with Peter Sellers, dancing with Kate Middleton and fighting with Tommy Chong.

I know you’re happily married, but I read that a few years ago you were seen snuggling with Kate Middleton?

She’s only human. I was at St. Andrews at a golf tournament, and they had just announced themselves as a couple, she and William. The band started playing and nobody was dancing and she got up from the table, came strutting across the floor and stuck out her hand and said, “Let’s dance,” and that she wanted to get the party started.

In the book you talk about interviewing celebs as a reporter, before you were in the entertainment business, people like Little Richard.

Somewhere in the process, like two in the morning, Little Richard realized, “Hey, they’re hippies, they smoke dope!” How unusual! He gets this little shoebox full of sticks and seeds. It was like, “Oh man, Richard, you got ghetto weed, dude.”

And Peter Sellers offered you a chunk of hash the size of a Hershey bar on your first visit to London?

It was amazing because he treated us as equals. It was surreal for us because we were brand new, and here was the world’s greatest comic actor, and it was like we were his buddies. Peter Sellers was unknowable cause he was in this other plane in this other consciousness and he drifted in and out of different stuff. I’ve never met anybody like him. He was really loving and giving and really generous, but he was unknowable.

Will recreational pot stay legal with Jeff Sessions running the Justice Department?

Their first statement was, “We’ll go after recreational.” They’re up to their ass in alligators right now. They don’t want to take on 32 states, and cut their tax base. And Sessions has always been a states-rights guy. You can’t be states rights for some things and not for others. I think they just said, “We’re going to leave it like it is.”

You and Tommy had great success together but things went south in the mid-’80s. What happened?

Tommy always had a very health ego. And then with the advent of fame and success, it gets blown up even more. I called him the world’s humblest megalomaniac. I don’t know if it was a macho thing, but he was used to being the leader. He couldn’t take anybody else challenging his leadership. Eventually, I had enough.

But you get along now?

We get along. We realize that we’re brothers, and we’re not best friends. Sometimes your brother pisses you off, but he’s always got your back, usually. We have a business and we’ll go along and do our business.

Legendary record producer Lou Adler gave you your first break, and directed your first movie, Up in Smoke. After that, you broke with him.

Up in Smoke, the deal that went down there, it was not a good deal for us. But it was partly our fault. We were just these two street hippies and never really had a lawyer to say, “You should take a look at this.” We were part and parcel of the times, very trusting, very open. The deal was bad and we tried to give him every opportunity to change it, and he chose not to, so goodbye. Maybe he believed we only had one film in us. We were estranged for a lot of years. At the end, we have a real good relationship.

You talked about Jeff Sessions and recreational use of pot, but what do you think is driving this conservative backlash?

It makes me wonder about the intelligence of the electorate. There were a lot of people who voted for Trump because they wanted a job. They didn’t bargain for the rest of this shit. I hope they’re starting to realize their mistake. This is the last gasp of the white uneducated. And they’re the dinosaurs in the tar pit. I feel sorry for them, too. I understand they’re not being listened to and they have a bad economic situation. It’s like, “Hey dude, welcome to our world.”

You have the largest private collection of Chicano art in the country. How do you expect the coming show, LA/LA, the largest showing of Chicano art ever, to impact the market?

We’re going to see a real expansion of all the Latinos who are working and creating great American school art, and American school art is not all Plymouth Rock. I’ve been collecting this for 30 years. It’s about getting access to platforms, and that’s what we’re doing.

Presented by The Griper – E.Cowan

Written by hollywoodreporter.com

Harrison Ford Says He Was “Distracted” During Passenger-Plane Incident

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Actor Harrison Ford said he was distracted and concerned about turbulence from another aircraft last month when he mistakenly landed on a taxiway at a Southern California airport after flying low over an airliner with 116 people aboard, according to an audio recording released Friday.

“I’m the schmuck who landed on the taxiway,” Ford told an air-traffic controller shortly after the near miss on Feb. 13 at John Wayne Airport in Orange County. Recordings of Ford’s conversations with air-traffic controllers were released Friday by the Federal Aviation Administration.

The 74-year-old actor was told to land his single-engine plane on Runway 20L, but he instead landed on a parallel taxiway. An American Airlines flight was on the same taxiway, waiting to take off.

A video released last month shows Ford’s Aviat Husky plane from behind as it descends toward the airfield where the American Airlines Boeing 737 is slowly taxiing.

“Was that airliner meant to be underneath me?” Ford asked the air-traffic control tower as he landed in the wrong spot.

“Oh. I landed on Taxiway Charlie. I understand now. Sorry for that,” said Ford.

In a phone call with an air-traffic controller after the incident, Ford said he “got distracted by the airliner” and also mentioned “big turbulence” from another plane that was landing.

The American Airlines flight, with 110 passengers and six crewmembers, departed safely for Dallas a few minutes later.

When an air-traffic controller told the Star Wars and Indiana Jones star to take his time getting the number from his pilot’s license, remarking it wasn’t a big deal, Ford responded: “It’s a big deal for me.”

Landing on a taxiway, instead of a runway, is a violation of Federal Aviation Administration regulations. The agency’s probe of the incident is still underway, spokesman Ian Gregor said Friday.

Ford’s publicist did not immediately respond to a request for comment Friday afternoon.

Ford, who collects vintage planes, has a long record as an aviator. He has had several close calls and a serious accident in March 2015, when he was injured in his World War II-era trainer. It crashed on a Los Angeles golf course after engine failure.

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Written by hollywoodreporter.com

Adam Sandler Expands Netflix Deal

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Adam Sandler and Netflix expanded a previous deal to release four additional movies for a total of eight on the streaming platform. The original collaboration was announced in 2014.

“Love working with Netflix and collaborating with them,” Sandler said in a statement, via Variety. “I love how passionate they are about making movies and getting them out there for the whole world to see.” Sandler’s first two films with Netflix included 2015’s western spoof The Ridiculous 6 and the 2016 spy-comedy The Do-Over. On April 14th, his Hollywood satire Sandy Wexler will be released and feature cameos from Chris Rock, Conan O’Brien, Judd Apatow and more.

Though Netflix doesn’t release their streaming numbers, the platform revealed that The Ridiculous 6 and The Do-Over are two of its most-watched original films. Sandler’s deal made him the first major film star to completely bypass theaters in favor of at-home viewing. Netflix is preparing a hefty collection of original films that will premiere exclusively with them instead of in theaters. This will include War Machine starring Brad Pitt, Okja starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Dee Rees’ Mudbound.

Outside of Netflix, Sandler is slated to star in Noah Baumbach’s Yeh Din Ka Kissa alongside Emma Thompson, Ben Stiller and Dustin Hoffman.

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Written by rollingstone.com

Leah Remini And Kevin James Reuniting In ‘Kevin Can Wait’ Finale

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In a Newhart-esque turn of events, Kevin James will be reuniting with one of his past TV wives on freshman comedy Kevin Can Wait.

CBS announced Friday that Leah Remini will appear alongside her former King of Queens co-star in the two-part May finale. She’ll play a cop and former colleague, with whom he once again goes undercover as husband and wife when he briefly comes out of retirement. (Only in the world of multicam sitcoms, am I right?)

Remini and James were an on-screen couple for a whopping nine seasons on The King of Queens. Kevin Can Wait, which stars Erinn Hayes as James’ latest sitcom wife, was recently renewed for a second season. The renewal came a little surprise given the solid ratings and the network’s confidence throughout the season, upping its episode count to 24. The season finale will air May 1 and May 8.

As for Remini, the actress has been particularly busy of late. Her A&E expose, Scientology and the Aftermath, recently scored a second season — and she also booked the lead role in NBC pilot What About Barb?

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Written by hollywoodreporter.com

 

Carrie Fisher’s Last-Ever ‘Star Wars’ Scenes Are Staying

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Scenes in the next “Star Wars” film shot with the late actress Carrie Fisher will remain in the movie unchanged, and the plot won’t be modified to deal with Fisher’s death, revealed Disney CEO Bob Iger.

“She’s in [Episode] VIII, and we’re not changing VIII to deal with her passing,” Iger said Thursday at a conference at the University of Southern California. “Her performance, which we’ve been really pleased with, remains as it was.”

When “we bought Lucasfilm, we were going to make three films — Episodes VII, VIII and IX,” said Iger. “We had to deal with tragedy at the end of 2016.”

Fisher, who died of a heart attack at the age of 60 in December, appears “throughout” the upcoming film, “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Iger said, according to the Los Angeles Times. Fisher had completed filming when she suffered the heart attack during a flight from London to Los Angeles.

“Star Wars: The Last Jedi” is scheduled to be released Dec. 15.

Devoted “Star Wars” fans were concerned that Fisher’s scenes would have to be cut — or that she would appear via a digital recreation, as Disney did for her cameo in last year’s “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” and for the character Grand Moff Tarkin, played by the late Peter Cushing.

In “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” (2015) Princess Leia had become a general and head of the resistance fighting the menacing First Order. She had a son with Han Solo named Ben, who joined the dark side under his new moniker Kylo Ren.

Disney shareholders were treated to scenes of the next film at their annual meeting earlier this month. One scene flashed an image of a grim-faced Fisher in her role as General Leia Organa. Her scenes reportedly include a confrontation with her son, played by Adam Driver, and a reunion with Luke Skywalker, still played by Mark Hamill.

Iger also dropped some hints about the upcoming Han Solo film, which stars Alden Ehrenreich as a younger version of the character Harrison Ford brought to life. It follows Han from the ages of 18 to 24 when he acquired his Millennium Falcon craft and his steadfast pal Chewbacca. The film is due out in 2018.

Iger spoke about Fisher and the ongoing “Star Wars” plans in an interview with his wife, Willow Bay, who was recently named dean of USC’s Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism, noted the Hollywood Reporter.

Disney is now discussing what to do after Episode XIX , said Iger, who talked of the possibility of “another decade and a half” of “Star Wars” films.

“It’s kind of mind-blowing to spend an afternoon with the creative team talking about that,” he said. “I mean, where could you go, or where should we go?” Then he answered his own question: “A galaxy far, far away.”

Fisher’s mom, actress Debbie Reynolds, died the day after her daughter. Reynolds’ son, Todd Fisher, said that Reynolds told him she “wanted to be with Carrie.”

Presented by The Griper – E.Cowan

Written by huffingtonpost.com

Robbie Robertson Remembers ‘Original Guitar God’ Chuck Berry

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One of the most indelible moments in Hail! Hail! Rock ‘n’ Roll, Taylor Hackford’s 1986 documentary on Chuck Berry, finds Robbie Robertson leafing through a scrapbook of various photos, ticket stubs and other Berry memorabilia and discussing the rock & roll pioneer’s process and legacy. “I tried to tell a story. It came from poetry,” Berry tells Robertson about his early lyrics. “Poetry portrays a scene or a story and that’s where my lyrics would originate from.”

Following Berry’s death Saturday, Robertson shared a poignant tribute to the singer-guitarist detailing the movie, corralling Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats Domino and Berry for a reunion show and a memorable visit to St. Louis to see his idol.

Through the years, I’ve had several classic rendezvous with the father of rock & roll. I was the original musical director and creative consultant for the Chuck Berry movie Hail! Hail! Rock ‘n’ Roll. After a couple of meetings with Chuck, I realized that he didn’t like being structured or musically directed so I wisely asked Keith Richards to take on that responsibility.

I loved Chuck and had a deep appreciation for him being one of the originators of rock & roll guitar and a brilliant poet. We ended up doing a thing for the movie where he recited poetry and I accompanied him on guitar. It was beautiful and his memory for poems totally impressed me. We laughed about how in school you could get your butt kicked for liking poetry. He said what turned that around for him was the beat generation.

Some years ago, I put together a gathering of the surviving founding fathers of rock & roll in New Orleans. We had Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats Domino and, of course, Chuck Berry. Just to see the four of them sitting there side by side was enough to take your breath away. This was IT! These four gentlemen made music that changed the world. I was so excited about this summit that I brought my son, Sebastian, to witness the event. ONCE IN A LIFETIME.

My friend Steve Bing flew us to pick up Jerry Lee in Memphis. Little Richard came in on his bus. Chuck insisted on traveling separately with his son Charles. Fats lives in NOLA so all we needed was a meeting place. I had convinced Jann Wenner, the chairman of the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame, that we needed to film this. So he put the production in motion. Peter Guralnick, the great music writer, came in to interview the four legends. It was hilarious, awkward, touching, sometimes competitive, paranoid and priceless. Proving once again you can’t wrangle cats. Especially the hippest, coolest cats like this group.

Just a few years ago, I had the opportunity to stop in St. Louis with some friends and visit Chuck. He was playing a gig that night at a club in town. Just to see him still taking the stage at his age was a momentous occasion. His daughter, Ingrid, and his son Charles were performing with him and had his back. In the dressing room, Ingrid said, “Oh dad, dad, you gotta hear Robbie’s song ‘Somewhere Down The Crazy River.'” Chuck smiled and said, “I like that title, you know why? Cuz that’s where I live, down the crazy river.” He laughed and patted me on the back.

I was so glad to see the original guitar god one more time. My son Sebastian had said to me, back in New Orleans, “Did you see his hands? Did you see those fingers? No wonder he can play like that. So much music came out of those hands. Wow!”

I heard that NASA had sent a copy of Chuck Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” up into outer space. Probably in case aliens from another world heard it. That would tell them something about us earthlings. And maybe … all they needed to know.

Bless his soul.

With love, Robbie Robertson

Presented by E.Cowan

Written by rollingstone.com

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