Daniel Day-Lewis Announces Retirement From Acting

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Daniel Day-Lewis, three-time Oscar winner and perhaps the “greatest actor alive,” is retiring from acting.

“Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor,” a spokesperson for the “Lincoln” star said in a statement to Variety. “He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject.”

Day-Lewis, 60, currently has one film in post-production, Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” which is set to hit theaters this Christmas. The movie follows a dressmaker in London in the 1950s who’s commissioned to design clothing for members of high society and the royal family. Day-Lewis will reportedly promote the film, an individual familiar with his plans told Variety.

The “Gangs of New York” actor, whose career in Hollywood has spanned decades, has been praised for his talent and ability to get lost in his roles.

He is the only male performer to ever win three Best Actor Oscars ― first, for his role in “My Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown,” then, for playing an oil man in “There Will Be Blood,” and finally, for playing President Lincoln in “Lincoln.” He was also nominated for his roles in “Gangs of New York” and “In the Name of the Father.”

As Variety notes, Day-Lewis also took a break from acting in the late ’90s to reportedly work as a cobbler.

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Written by huffingtonpost.com

Stephen Furst Passes Away At 63

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Stephen Furst, best known for getting his start in “Animal House,” has passed away due to complications with diabetes, Variety can confirm. He was 63 years old.

Furst died in his Moorpark, Calif. home on Friday. His sons Nathan and Griff Furst confirmed their father’s death on Facebook Saturday evening.

“Steve has a long list of earthly accomplishments,” began his boys. “He was known to the world as a brilliant and prolific actor and filmmaker, but to his family and many dear friends he was also a beloved husband, father, and kind friend whose memory will always be a blessing.”

Those other accomplishments include the National Lampoon spinoff “Delta House,” as well as starring roles on “Babylon 5” and “St. Elsewhere,” to name a few. In 2016, the actor made headlines for protesting the Academy’s rule change. Furst was also a spokesperson for the American Diabetes Association.

“To truly honor him, do not cry for the loss of Stephen Furst,” requested Furst’s sons. “Rather, enjoy memories of all the times he made you snicker, laugh, or even snort to your own embarrassment. He intensely believed that laugher is the best therapy, and he would want us to practice that now.”

Furst’s wife Lorraine Wright also died in 2017.

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Written by variety.com

Celebrating The Age Of Paul McCartney

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When Paul McCartney was 16, he wrote “When I’m 64.” The song eventually turned up on the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” a landmark album released 17 days before his 25th birthday.

Early next month, McCartney heads out on a U.S. tour that begins a day after the 60th anniversary of 15-year-old Paul’s first meeting 16-year-old John Lennon at a church fair in Liverpool.

McCartney turns 75 Sunday – the latest milestone for a music great who once seemed too young to pen a sentimental tune about aging and now might seem too old to play rocking three-hour shows, night after night.

But McCartney’s made a storied career out of defying age and expectations.

The arrival of the Beatles and the mania that ensued displayed the power and possibility of youth in pop culture and beyond. The band’s endurance – evidenced recently by record-setting Spotify streams and the re-ascension of “Sgt. Pepper” on the charts – underscores the timelessness of their work and appeal.

That McCartney and Ringo Starr, who turns 77 next month, keep touring and making new albums when they could easily retire to the Isle of Wight, or wherever they want, speaks to the life force that surges through great music.

McCartney and Starr likely get as much out of their performances as their intergenerational legions of fans do. The surviving Beatles also are playing for Lennon and George Harrison, both lost before their time.

Even with the “many years from now” cited in “When I’m 64” long past, McCartney appears destined to keep performing his songs, new and old.

The Beatles exist on a plane where past and present merge in real time, with every discovery and rediscovery of their catalog. Anniversaries and birthdays offer a fine excuse not only to listen, but to celebrate the never-ending age the Beatles and Paul McCartney.

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Written by nbcnewyork.com

Mike Myers Returns In The Weirdest Way Possible

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For the last several years, Mike Myers has been hiding in plain sight. The beloved comedian—who spent the 90s and early aughts pelting viewers with hits like Austin Powers and Wayne’s World—has slowed down his output, favoring documentaries over features. The last proper movie he did was 2010’s Shrek Forever After; since then, he’s appeared in a handful of documentaries, such as Being Canadian (an inscrutable title), and even directed one, titled Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon, about the titular talent agent. Seven years later, though, Myers is finally ready to step back into the limelight. Well, sort of. It’s time to meet Tommy Maitland, Myers’s latest comedic alter-ego.

On June 22, ABC is premiering a strange new incarnation of the classic talent contest The Gong Show, hosted by legendary British comedian “Tommy Maitland” . . . who is actually Mike Myers, with loads of transformative makeup, an accent, and a detailed fake backstory. Myers will stay in character as Maitland throughout his tenure on the show. Maitland’s got his own Twitter and everything, tweeting out charming Britishisms like “cheeky monkey,” which seems to be his catchphrase.

Viewers were first introduced to Maitland in May, when Will Arnett (who executive produces the rebooted Gong Show) guest-hosted Jimmy Kimmel Live and brought out Maitland as a guest. ABC released a new trailer for the show on Wednesday, and is also all-in on the fake host fantasy, referring to the personality as Maitland instead of Myers in all the show’s promotional material.

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Written by vanityfair.com

Adam West Passes Away At 88

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The actor struggled to find work after the campy superhero series was canceled, but he rebounded with voiceover gigs, including one as the mayor of Quahog on ‘Family Guy.’

Adam West, the ardent actor who managed to keep his tongue in cheek while wearing the iconic cowl of the Caped Crusader on the classic 1960s series Batman, has died. He was 88.

West, who was at the pinnacle of pop culture after Batman debuted in January 1966, only to see his career fall victim to typecasting after the ABC show flamed out, died Friday night in Los Angeles after a short battle with leukemia, a family spokesperson said.

West died peacefully surrounded by his family and is survived by his wife Marcelle, six children, five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. “Our dad always saw himself as The Bright Knight and aspired to make a positive impact on his fans’ lives. He was and always will be our hero,” his family said in a statement.

After struggling for years without a steady job, the good-natured actor reached a new level of fame when he accepted an offer to voice the mayor of Quahog — named Adam West; how’s that for a coincidence! — on Seth MacFarlane’s long-running Fox animated hit Family Guy.

On the big screen, West played a wealthy Main Line husband who meets an early end in Paul Newman’s The Young Philadelphians (1959), was one of the first two humans on the Red Planet in Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964) and contributed his velvety voice to the animated Redux Riding Hood (1997), which received an Oscar nomination for best short film.

Raised on a ranch outside Walla Walla, Wash., West caught the attention of Batman producer William Dozier when he played Captain Quik, a James Bond-type character with a sailor’s cap, in commercials for Nestle’s Quik.

West, who had appeared in many Warner Bros. television series as a studio contract player, was filming the spaghetti Western The Relentless Four (1965) in Europe at the time. He returned to the States to meet with Dozier, “read the pilot script and knew after 20 pages that it was the kind of comedy I wanted to do,” he said in a 2006 interview with the Archive of American Television.

He signed a contract on the spot, only asking that he be given the chance to approve who would play his sidekick, Robin, the Boy Wonder. (He would OK the casting of Burt Ward, who had a brown belt in karate but zero acting experience).

“The tone of our first show, by Lorenzo Semple Jr., was one of absurdity and tongue in cheek to the point that I found it irresistible,” West said. “I think they recognized that in me from what they’d seen me do before. I understood the material and brought something to it.

“You can’t play Batman in a serious, square-jawed, straight-ahead way without giving the audience the sense that there’s something behind that mask waiting to get out, that he’s a little crazed, he’s strange.”

The hunky Lyle Waggoner (later of The Carol Burnett Show) and Peter Deyell also tested to play the Gotham City crime fighters, but West and Ward clearly were superior, and Batman debuted at 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 12, 1966, a Wednesday.

The cliffhanger episode would be resolved the very next night — Same Bat-time! Same Bat-channel! The show was originally intended to last an hour, but ABC split it up when it had two time slots available on its primetime schedule.

West said that he played Batman “for laughs, but in order to do [that], one had to never think it was funny. You just had to pull on that cowl and believe that no one would recognize you.”

The series, filmed in eye-popping bright colors in an era of black-and-white and featuring a revolving set of villains like the Riddler (Frank Gorshin), Joker (Cesar Romero), Penguin (Burgess Meredith) and Catwoman (Julie Newmar), was an immediate hit; the Thursday installment was No. 5 in the Nielsen ratings for the 1965-66 season, and the Wednesday edition was No. 10.

“Stellar, exemplar, a king to the end,” Newmar said in a statement: “He was bright, witty and fun to work with. I will miss him in the physical world and savor him always in the world of imagination and creativity. He meant so much to people.”

Batman was nominated for the Emmy Award for outstanding comedy series in its first year, losing out to CBS’ The Dick Van Dyke Show. A 20th Century Fox movie was rushed into production and played in theaters in the summer before season two kicked off in September 1966.

However, the popularity of the show soon plummeted, and Batman — despite the addition of Yvonne Craig as Batgirl — was canceled in March 1968 after its third season.

West quickly struggled to find work, forced to make appearances in his cape and cowl at car shows and carnivals and in such obscure films as The Marriage of a Young Stockbroker (1971), written by Semple, and The Happy Hooker Goes Hollywood (1980). He and his family downsized, leaving their home in the tony Pacific Palisades for Ketchum, Idaho.

“The people who were hiring, the people who were running the studios, running the shows, were dinosaurs,” the actor said in the 2013 documentary Starring Adam West. “They thought Batman was a big accident, that there was no real creative thought, expertise or art behind it. They were wrong.”

He returned to voice his iconic character in such cartoons as The New Adventures of Batman, Legends of the Superheroes, SuperFriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show and The Simpsons, and Warner Bros.’ long-awaited DVD release of ABC’s Batman in 2014 brought him back into the Bat Signal’s spotlight.

He was born William West Anderson in Seattle on Sept. 19, 1928, the second of two sons. His father, Otto, was a wheat farmer; his mother, Audrey, was a pianist and opera singer.

West attended an all-boys high school, then graduated with a major in English literature from Whitman College. During his senior year, he worked for a local radio station, doing everything from Sunday morning religion shows to the news.

He also starred in a couple of plays at the local theater. “I found that I could move an audience and I was appreciated,” he said.

In the Army, West served as an announcer on American Forces Network television, then worked as the station manager at Stanford while he was a graduate student.

He got a job at a McClatchy station in Sacramento, Calif., then moved to Hawaii, where he hosted a two-hour weekday show in the late 1950s with a diaper-wearing chimp named Peaches. (West said he once interviewed William Holden as the actor was passing through.)

West got a contract at Warner Bros. at $150 a week and was placed in one of the studio’s TV series — Colt .45, Maverick, Hawaiian Eye, 77 Sunset Strip, Cheyenne, etc. — pretty much every week.

He got his first regular TV role when he played Det. Sgt. Steve Nelson under the command of Robert Taylor on the 1959-62 ABC/NBC series The Detectives, coming aboard when that show expanded to one hour in color.

After he split with Warner Bros., West showed up in such forgettable films as Geronimo (1962) starring Chuck Connors, Tammy and the Doctor (1963) with Sandra Dee and in The Three Stooges film The Outlaws Is Coming (1965) before Batman changed his life forever.

He later starred in a rejected 1991 NBC pilot episode called Lookwell — written by Conan O’Brien and Robert Smigel — in which he portrayed a once-famous TV detective who thinks he can solve crimes in real life.

Then came the gig on MacFarlane’s Family Guy.

“I had done a pilot with Seth that he had written for me. It turned out we had the same kind of comic sensibilities and got along well,” he said in a 2012 interview. “When Family Guy came around and Seth became brilliantly successful, he decided to call me and see what I was doing. He asked if I would like to come aboard as the mayor, and I thought it would be neat to do something sort of absurd and fun.”

The documentary Starring Adam West culminates with him receiving a star on The Hollywood Hall of Fame in 2012.

He married Marcelle in 1970; they met when she was the wife of the Lear Jet founder and they posed for a publicity photo at Santa Monica Airport, with him in his Batman costume. (They each had two children from their previous marriages, then added a couple of their own.)

When Batman was canceled, “The only thing I thought is that it would be the end of me, and it was for a bit,” he told an audience at Comic-Con in 2014. “But then I realized that what we created in the show … we created this zany, lovable world.

“I look around and I see the adults — I see you grew up with me, and you believe in the adventure. I never believed this would happen, that I would be up here with illustrious people like yourselves. I’m so grateful! I’m the luckiest actor in the world, folks, to have you still hanging around.”

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Written by hollywoodreporter.com

Bill Cosby’s Desperate Plea Deal NIXED

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Just hours before his trial was set to begin, a desperate Bill Cosby sought an eleventh hour plea deal, RadarOnline.com can exclusively reveal.

According to insiders, the disgraced comic begged for a deal that would include no jail time and no admission of guilt.

Meanwhile, prosecutors want the 79-year-old to face the music.

A source inside the Montgomery County District Attorney’s office said D.A. Kevin Steele demanded “significant” jail time, a large fine and community service.

“Bill Cosby wants Steele to agree to a deal in which an announcement would be made basically saying that the prosecution couldn’t prove its case and that the defense had nothing to prove so it’s a win for him,” the insider said.

“He’s desperate, his defense is desperate because [what he’s accused of is] indefensible,” the source continued. “It should be mentioned that they [the defense] came to [prosecutors] because the day of reckoning has arrived and maybe he’s opened his eyes and realized that he’s about to go to prison maybe for the rest of his life.”

Cosby, who turns 80 next month, faces 10 years in prison if convicted of the three counts of sexual assault which he’s accused of. Those charges include the drugging and raping former Temple University athlete Andrea Constand.

Dozens of women have come forward claiming they were drugged and raped by the comedian once known as America’s Dad.

“They haven’t discussed anything feasible for Bill Cosby,” a source connected to the comedian said of the plea negotiations. “It’s a witch hunt and they are making sure to try and bury him. It’s unfortunate.”

This isn’t the first time the alleged serial rapist has sought a deal with prosecutors.

After a judge ruled to admit Cosby’s shocking civil deposition, in which he cops to plying women with Quaaludes before having sex with them while their zonked out, as evidence, the comedian sought a deal.

In the bombshell 2006 deposition, Cosby admitted to giving Constand Quaaludes.

“When you got the Quaaludes, was it in your mind that you were going to use these Quaaludes for young women that you wanted to have sex with?” Constand’s former lawyer Dolores Troiani, asked Cosby during that deposition.

“Yes,” Cosby answered.

Later in the deposition, the comic described putting his hands down Constand’s pants: “I don’t hear her say anything, anything. And I don’t feel her say anything. And so, I continue and I go into the area that is somewhere between permission and rejection. I am not stopped.”

Cosby, perhaps sensing his possible doom, is now seeking a deal for leniency.

“He and his family are convinced this trial will end badly,” a source close to the comedian said.

In December, an insider told the New York Post that “Cosby and his family believes he’ll be eligible for a sentence of just probation. . .and remove the threat of him dying in prison.”

Now, Cosby has tried another Hail Mary by attempting to butter up hard-nosed prosecutor Steele, implying that a plea deal would give the DA a major victory over a celebrity.

Cosby also tried to “play the sympathy card,” the prosecution source said.

“They want Steele to take into consideration that he’s old and he’s blind. But, he had to be reminded that this is the Justice System and the Justice System doesn’t play favors because of someone’s celebrity or because they’ve grown a bit old. With age, sometimes comes health”

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Written by radaronline.com

Run For The Hills, Bill Maher Used The ‘N’ Word

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Bill Maher apologized and HBO scolded him publicly. But will that be enough to quiet the storm over Maher’s use of a racial slur during Friday’s edition of “Real Time with Bill Maher”?

Public outrage swelled following Friday’s 10 p.m. live airing of “Real Time with Bill Maher.” HBO issued a statement Saturday calling the host’s use of the phrase “I’m a house nigger” during an interview with Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse “completely inexcusable and tasteless.” HBO said the remark would be edited out of subsequent airings of the episode. Maher made the comment in jest after Sasse invited Maher to spend a day working in the fields of Nebraska’s farms.

Maher acknowledged that the N-word was “offensive” and said he regretted using it. “Friday nights are always my worst night of sleep because I’m up reflecting on the things I should or shouldn’t have said on my live show. Last night was a particularly long night as I regret the word I used in the banter of a live moment,” he said in a statement issued Saturday.

By multiple accounts, HBO has no plans to take any action against Maher, who has been a mainstay at the network since 2003. A source noted that Maher has rarely offered any kind of mea culpa for provocative comments. Most recently, he stood firm in the face of harsh criticism for his decision to have the controversial blogger Milo Yiannopoulos, known for his racially charged online postings, as a guest on his show. The formal apology for using the N-word indicates that he recognizes that a line was crossed, something that was important to HBO.

But the fury voiced on social media after Friday’s airing stirred up examples of past statements from Maher about Muslims and the LGBTQ community that were widely deemed offensive. ThinkProgress, the editorial arm of the liberal Center for American Progress Action Fund, posted an article declaring “Bill Maher has been a public racist for a long time” with links to past clips from “Real Time.”

The anger is an echo of the groundswell that led to the ouster in April of Bill O’Reilly, after the New York Times published an expose on sexual harassment allegations leveled at the Fox News host. It also has a parallel in Maher’s past. Maher’s ABC late-night show “Politically Incorrect” was axed after five years in June 2002 following Maher’s observation that the U.S.’s post-9/11 bombing campaigns against terrorist targets were cowardly acts. The comment sparked advertiser defections from the show — a pressure point that can’t be used in the commercial-free environment of HBO.

But at a moment of great political and cultural strife in the country, inflammatory statements and actions have been the undoing of numerous public figures. Just this past week, Kathy Griffin was forced to apologize amid a tidal wave of criticism from both the right and the left when she posed for a photo with a prop depicting President Trump’s bloodied, severed head. Despite her apology, that stunt quickly cost Griffin her gig co-hosting CNN’s New Year’s Eve coverage with Anderson Cooper.

For Maher, another damaging video clip making the rounds on Saturday is an interview with comedian Wayne Brady from HuffPost Live in 2012, after Brady and Maher tangled over the latter’s assertion that Brady was a “non-threatening black man.” Brady said the comment indicates that Maher has a stereotypical view of black men as menacing.

“When I talk to you again, I’ll give you that black dude and I will beat your ass in public,” Brady said of Maher in 2012.

Maher and “Real Time” have long been highly regarded in industry circles for the host’s willingness to confront thorny issues. The show earned consecutive Emmy noms for best talk-variety show from 2005 through 2014, and was nommed again in 2016.

Reaction from viewers and industry insiders via social media to Maher’s comment was, not surprisingly, fast and furious, and overwhelmingly negative. But Maher does have prominent supporters, such as author and Georgetown University professor Michael Eric Dyson.

Dyson condemned Maher’s use of the N-word but defended his record of offering a platform to an array of African-American perspectives on politics and culture. “Given the Bill Maher I know, he will use this opportunity to strengthen his role as an ally to black people,” Dyson wrote.

Spike Lee, meanwhile, had mixed feelings about the comedian.

“Oh, him using the n-word? I think it’s problematic. I’ll leave it at that,” he told Variety at a Brooklyn event on Saturday. “I like Bill Maher, but I don’t know if he should have used the n-word.”

Presented by The Griper – E.Cowan

The President can destroy the Earth, grab Pussy and do whatever the fuck he wants but Bill Maher can’t say a word in context? #spareme

Written by variety.com

Leah Remini Joins CBS’ ‘Kevin Can Wait’ As Series Regular

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The King of Queens reunion on Kevin Can Wait is becoming permanent. Leah Remini, who guest starred in the two-part season finale of Kevin James’ freshman comedy, is joining the cast of the CBS sitcom as a series regular for its second season.

She will reprise her role as the tough, wise-cracking undercover police woman Vanessa Cellucci when Kevin Can Wait returns in the fall.

James and Remini starred together for nine seasons on the popular CBS comedy series The King of Queens, which aired in the same time slot where Kevin Can Wait is for most of the season, Monday 8 PM.

Kevin Can Wait ranked as this past season’s No. 1 new comedy in total viewers (9.19 million) and adults 18-49 (2.1 rating).

Remini recently starred in the NBC comedy pilot What About Barb? and has been making headlines with her documentary series Scientology and the Aftermath on A&E

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Written by deadline.com

Kathy Griffin ‘Devastated’ Over CNN Firing

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The 56-year-old comedian was ‘inconsolable’ after getting canned, says a pal.

Kathy Griffin is “inconsolable” after getting axed by CNN over her controversial Trump tweet, RadarOnline.com has learned.

As Radar reported, the 53-year-old fiery red head posted a photo depicting herself holding a model of President Trump’s severed head yesterday and was subsequently fired by CNN, despite her apology.

“Kathy is just absolutely devastated right now and has been crying hysterically but no one knows what to say to make her feel better right now,” a source close to Griffin told Radar.

“Kathy lives for the CNN gig and hosting NYE show is her proudest moment of the year. She just can’t believe that Anderson Cooper took sides when he has talked so much about Trump.”

As previously reported, Griffin promptly took down the disturbing photo after backlash exploded online.

But it was too late.

“Her non-celebrity friends are really worried about her right now,” the insider claimed. “But she asked her A-list pals such as Pharell Williams and Cher to tweet out support for her and they just haven’t.”

“Kathy has burned a lot of people in her life and now her haters are calling in her karma.”

Presented by The Griper – E.Cowan

She went too far and forgive us Kathy, you knew exactly what you were doing. Unfortunately for you, the line you thought you were getting close to was beyond where most thought it should be. Still…it was just a picture…get over it America

Written by radaronline.com

Happy Endings Abound In The ‘Love Actually’ Mini-Sequel

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“Love Actually” is still all around us, thanks to the mini-sequel that aired Thursday during NBC’s Red Nose Day charity special. We are now blessed with an update on most of the characters from the 2003 Christmas hit that continues to inspire obsession and vitriol around the world.

It’s happy endings (mostly) all around. The couples formed in the film ― Natalie (Martine McCutcheon) and the prime minister (Hugh Grant), Jamie (Colin Firth) and Aurelia (Lucia Moniz), even Sam (Thomas Brodie-Sangster) and Joanna (Olivia Olson) ― are still together. Mark (Andrew Lincoln) is still showing up at Juliet’s (Keira Knightley) door while Peter (Chiwetel Ejiofor) awaits her return, but now Mark is married to Kate Moss. Billy Mack’s (Bill Nighy) manager has died, but Billy is still recording half-baked publicity singles and giving cantankerous radio interviews. Rufus (Rowan Atkinson) is methodically packaging gifts at Walgreens, because product placement is real, and Daniel is inquiring about Sam’s life on that same waterfront bench (sans Claudia Schiffer). The happiest ending of all goes to Sarah (Laura Linney), who’s bagged a new fellow played by Patrick Dempsey.

Cast members missing from the roster: Emma Thompson, Alan Rickman (who died in 2016), Rodrigo Santoro, Kris Marshall and the rest of Colin’s crew, and Martin Freeman and Joanna Page, who played the flirty body doubles.

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Written by huffingtonpost.com

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